What is Police Misconduct?

Misconduct is when a police officer acts outside of their powers or breaks the law.

If you’ve been a victim of police misconduct, you may be able to pursue recourse through a civil claim.

The following lists some common causes of action, and some examples of the misconduct claims that can be pursued:

Assault

  • Excessive use of OC spray (commonly referred to as “pepper spray” or “capsicum spray”)
  • Physical assault (hitting, kicking, pushing etc.)
  • Pointing of a gun
  • Spitting
  • Threat to harm

False imprisonment

  • Detention under circumstances that seem unlawful.
  • Custody when unnecessary; can be restrained in handcuffs or deprived of liberty.

Malicious prosecution

  • Charges must have resolved in the individual’s favour.
  • Charges struck out by Magistrate at the Committal stage.

Misfeasance in public office

  • Circumstances where police have intentionally engaged in an invalid or unauthorised act against an individual in the course of their duties.

Negligence

  • Where the person has suffered harm, or death, in police custody. (Read more about Coronial Inquests)

Outside of these circumstances we recommend contacting us for further advice.

FACT SHEET – Freedom of Information Applications to Victoria Police

A Freedom of Information (F0I) application is a request made pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act 1982, which gives people with a right of access to documents held by Australian Government ministers and most agencies.

FACT SHEET – Complaints Against Police

If you have been the subject of police misconduct, making a complaint may be the most appropriate course of action in your circumstances.

If you have suffered injury as a result of police misconduct, you may have a compensable claim through civil litigation. These claims involve suing the State of Victoria for compensation. Our team is specialised in these litigations, and we work with claimants to make sure their interests and rights are best represented.

We work with families and other interested parties on cases where a person has died in police or corrections custody, deaths whilst incarcerated in prison, and deaths where police officers have attempted to take a person into custody.

If you have suffered injury as a result of police misconduct, you may have a compensable claim through civil litigation. These claims involve suing the State of Victoria for compensation. Our team is specialised in these litigations, and we work with claimants to make sure their interests and rights are best represented.

I am text block. Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.

Jeremy King

Jeremy is a Principal Lawyer and lead of the police misconduct team. He practices in the area of police torts and and has been extensively involved in advocacy for reform of police oversight. Jeremy is regularly featured in the media for comment on police misconduct cases.

Danielle Meyer

Danielle is a Principal Lawyer and head of the personal injury team. Danielle has experience in police misconduct matters like assault and battery, false imprisonments, malicious prosecutions and misfeasance cases.

Ali Besiroglu

Ali represents families and interested parties with coronial inquiries, and has significant court advocacy experience. With a background in criminal law, he helps the team analyse and evaluate all the developments of criminal cases prior to civil proceedings.

Nick Boag

Nick graduated with a Bachelor of Laws from the Australian National University (ANU) in 2008 and also holds a Masters of Law from ANU and a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Melbourne. Nick first joined Robinson Gill in 2013 before working at the Police Accountability Project at the Flemington & Kensington Community Legal Centre and then as a Judge’s Associate at the County Court of Victoria. Nick rejoined Robinson Gill in 2018 and specialises in Police Misconduct and other personal injury matters. Nick is a member of the Law Institute of Victoria’s Administrative Law & Human Rights Committee.

Peggy Lee

Peggy graduated with a Juris Doctor degree from the University of Melbourne in 2017. Following her graduation, Peggy joined Robinson Gill, inspired to practice law in a way which produces a fair outcome for the people who need its protection. Peggy grew up in Hong Kong and is fluent in English, Mandarin and Cantonese. She is a member of Law Institute of Victoria, the Australian Lawyers Alliance, the Asian-Australian Law Association and the Eastern Solicitors Law Association.

Box Hill

View on Google maps
Car parking available on-site. Meetings by appointment only.

More than 95 per cent of Victoria’s COVID-19 fines have not been paid [3AW]

New data shows that more than 95 per cent of fines issued for breaches of the Chief Health Officer’s directions have not yet been paid.

Body-worn police camera laws in VIC need urgent revision for use in civil matters [Australian Lawyers Alliance]

Laws surrounding body-worn police cameras in Victoria need urgent revision so that access to video footage cannot be denied in civil proceedings, says the Australian Lawyers Alliance (ALA).

Police camera ruling ‘denies courts critical evidence’ [The Age]

Victoria Police officers cannot be compelled to release footage from body-worn cameras in civil proceedings following a County Court decision last month which has prompted calls for urgent reform of the laws that regulate their use.

‘Go to your room for two weeks’: lockdown toll on aged care residents [The Age]

The residents of a Melbourne aged care home with no active coronavirus cases have been told that if they leave to visit a doctor, they must stay in their rooms for a fortnight upon their return.